48 Hours in Cambodia's Friendly Capital: Phnom Penh

 

“Phnom Penh, capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia, located at the confluence of the Mekong and Tonlé Sap rivers”. When I read that description I immediately got excited about visiting this leafy South-East Asian city. To me, it sounded like one of those Indiana Jones-cities I love with bustling streets and interesting scenes to photograph. And yet, most people skip Phnom Penh to rush towards the temples of Angkor or the beaches. A few times I even read that some people find it a city to avoid... Did they visit the same city?

 Tonlé Sap River.

Tonlé Sap River.

Unfortunately, we didn't have much time in Phnom Penh and in hindsight we would've loved a few more days exploring the streets filled with friendly locals and Asian charm. Even though there aren't that many tourist attractions and the main one is a memory about the horrible events that took place in Cambodia (more on that later), it's one of those cities where you just want to get lost and relax for a few days. It's surprisingly easy to walk around and there's a vibe that no other Asian city has.

 Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum.

Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum.

The Riverside

We didn't know the best areas to stay so we were lucky to have booked a guesthouse close to the promenade along the Tonlé Sap river. It's the place where everybody goes at night and the views over the river when the sun sets are amazing. We happened to be there in the weekend during the celebrations of the king's birthday so it was crowded but not in an uncomfortable way like some other cities. You can feel that Phnom Penh has not yet been jaded by mass tourism and that's a joy to explore and photograph.

 Promenade.

Promenade.

The promenade was filled with locals celebrating the birthday of the king by eating and drinking together on the banks of the river. No touts trying to scam you, no pushy vendors trying to sell you stuff. If you ever go to Cambodia, don't skip Phnom Penh because now is the time to visit. High rise buildings and Western style shopping malls are popping up so it's just a matter of time before the vibrant and friendly capital of Cambodia starts losing some of its charm.

 View of the Sokha Hotel across the river.

View of the Sokha Hotel across the river.

 Riverside Promenade.

Riverside Promenade.



Killing Fields and Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum

What it will never lose though, is the horrible history and the main reason why I wanted to visit Phnom Penh. The Cambodian genocide took place before I was born so I only know about it from history classes in school. Visiting Cambodia meant I could finally learn more about what happened.

 Staircase.

Staircase.

Tuol Sleng is a former high school used as Security Prison S-21 by the Khmer Rouge in the late seventies and the Killing Fields or Choeung Ek is the place where thousands of people were executed after being tortured at S-21. One million people were killed by the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia during those horrible years.

Our visit started with a bad tuk tuk experience. The tuk tuk driver that took us to both places was visibly exhausted and by the time he took us from the Killing Fields to the Tuol Sleng Museum he was literally falling asleep behind the wheel. We arrived at the museum really late because of the slow, dangerously wonky drive and ended our agreement with our driver telling him he didn't have to wait for us anymore. We didn't pay him the full amount and later thought we should have paid even less.

 Empty room.

Empty room.

 View on Building D.

View on Building D.

While visiting the Killing Fields was an experience that gave us chills, the Tuol Sleng Museum was even worse. Roaming around the haunted school building, going inside the rooms and seeing the metal beds on which prisoners used to be tortured was a much needed wake up call. What took place there was far worse than what I learned in school and I'm not going to describe it because it's not possible. The audio guides are a must and are really well done.

 Prison cells built inside the class rooms.

Prison cells built inside the class rooms.

Visit wonderful Cambodia and don't forget Phnom Penh to learn as much as you can about the horrible events that took place during the genocide. You'll appreciate the incredibly friendly Cambodians and their country even more...